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, it's "meet the press." >>> wall of destruction, the death toll soars from japan's twin disasters as authorities race to head off nuclear meltdowns. >>> shock waves, the situation in japan raises fears over the safety of nuclear power plants here at home. >>> and whiteout, a late winter blizzard leaves hundreds of motorists stranded in north dakota. >>> good morning, those stories and more straight ahead, this is first look on msnbc. >>> and we begin this morning with a country in crisis, in japan this morning, rescuers are searching for signs of life beneath the rubble as the clock ticks in the wake of friday's epic disaster. japanese please say they've recovered another 1,000 bodies that washed ashore along the miyagi coast, rising a mounting death toll that is believed to be above 10,000, nbc's kristen dahlgren joins us from tokyo with more. >> reporter: there have been more than 300 aftershocks registered here there were new warnings today. and now growing concerns over the possibility of a nuclear accident. with heavy equipment, and bare hands, rescue workers continue the des
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
alert. t the disaster in japan keeps getting worse. japanese officials confirm that a meltdown could be occurring and we will have the latest. >> dave: this as the death toll is rising, the number of people killed could top a staggering 10,000 in one state alone. >> clayton: take a look at this, satellite image showing what a city in japan looked like before and then after the tsunami. stunning images show how powerful the natural disaster really was. "fox & friends," hour two, starts right now. . >> dave: for many of you it's hour number one, those of you that didn't spring forward and get the clocks reset. it is hour number two. >> clayton: and a lot happening. the nuclear explosion in one of the plants was-- the word from the government that the plant is on the verge of a meltdown. >> alisyn: hard to know. what's the late s, david. >> reporter: there's a warning from the government that there could be an explosion at the plant, there's been a build up of hydrogen, different from the one yesterday and warning that there could have been already a partial meltdown of one of the unit
retaliation and destabilization of the region. but first, we turn to japan. where emergency workers are feverishly trying to cool down overheating fuel rods at the earthquake and tsunami-stricken nuclear plant. a u.n. nuclear official says the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality.
>>> good morning. disaster in japan. another 1,000 bodies washed up along japan's earthquake and tsunami-ravaged coast, as the nuclear crisis deepens, with a new explosion at an already damaged power plant. ann curry reports live from the region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, march 14, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> the images continue to haunt us all. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith vieira. japan's prime minister calling this the gravest crisis in his country since world war ii. >> the death toll is now estimated at 10,000. that's expected to climb. so far, about 2,800 people are confirmed dead including those 1,000 bodies discovered overnight. meanwhile, 11 workers have been injured during a second hydrogen explosion today at the fukushima nuclear plant and the u.s. military shifted some of the fleet further away from shore after military personnel were exposed to low level radiation. the state department is warning americans
at the pentagon. >>> let's go to japan where fears continue to spread, the death toll continues to client. today marks one week after the massive earthquake and the devastating tsunami which battered the country. 6,911 are confirmed dead and another 10,000 are still missing. survivors across japan observed a moment of silence today at the exact time that the quake struck. many still wearing face masks, many of them still in shock. a lot of the survivors are huddling in nearby shelters. japanese media reporting some 380,000 people in shelters. what makes matters worse, some of the shelters with without power and facing freezing temperatures. some survivors are returning home for the first time since the tsunami like this retired firefighter. he lost his home and entire family. >> translator: my wife, my son's family and four grandchildren. i lost them all. >> as for the nuclear crisis, things are not looking much better in fukushima. japan's nuclear agency raised the crisis level on the damaged planted there. you're looking at it, from a four to a five. that raises it to the same level as three m
tougher attacks if he did nothing. >>> regulators in japan ignored safety warnings in one reactor and botched insus, are we competent the inspection system in this country is any better? >>> donald trump foreign policy. cheat moammar gadhafi out of his money. >>> we start with a deepening crisis in libya. nbc news chief correspondent richard engel standing by in benghazi, libya. the latest on theç ground. yesterday are you were pessimistic about the rebel force. some who have military training aren't using it. any better sign of their ability to move on tripoli today? >> reporter: no, still they are untrained and they don't have the capability to really take territory. this is something that the rebels themselves realize. i was speaking with some of the leaders of this revolt tonight and they were quite despondent. they are starting to look for outside help. they want military advisors on the ground from the united states. they said they are willing to hire them if necessary. but they recognize that if they don't get their acts together they are not going to be able to advance t
that libya is sending gas prices to japan, americans are pessimistic about our economy. a new cnbc poll has 37%, more than a third now, say the economy will get worse in the next year. that is bad news. that's a 16-point rise in the bad news estimate since december. and the poll's all-time high we're really pessimistic about it now. >>> obviously the united states is pleased with yesterday's vote. it sent a strong message that needs to be heated. the efforts by the international community to come together to make clear to colonel gadhafi that he cannot continue violence against his own people. they cannot continue the attack that started out by peacefully demonstrating for changes that are within the right of any human being. >> well there you have it. secretary clinton. welcome back to hardball. secretary clinton today. what's next? the representative to the united nations, national securities reporter mark thompson. let me ask you -- i read two things at the same time. one through the united states through the president reading a particular u.n. resolution. we're going with a no-fly zone
today as one of those troubled reactors in japan. why this could be the worst thing we've hed so far. we'll be right back. i was diagnosed with copd. i could not take a deep breath i noticed i was having trouble. climbing the stairs, working in the garden, painting. my doctor suggested spiriva right then. no announcer: spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled maintenance treatment for copd, which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. love what it does. it opens up the airways. announcer: spiriva does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. stop taking spiriva and call your doctor right away if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, have vision changes or eye pain, g or have problems passing urine. tell your doctor if you have glaucoma, problems passing urine, as or an enlarged prostate, as these may worsen with spiriva. also, discuss the medicines you take, even eye drops. ip side effects include dry mouth, constipation, and trouble passing urine. th it makes me breathe easier. i can't do everything i used to do. but there's a lot i
. frightening moments for some workers at that troubled nuclear power plant in japan. what made them flee for their lives. >>> searching for spring. unseasonably cold weather puts a chill on the cherry blossoms and many areas of this country. >>> and summer breeze. why it might be a whole lot easier to find a summer job in twlechbt. >>> good morning, everyone, i'm alex witt. welcome to "msnbc sunday." let's get to what's happening right now beginning with new this morning. robert gates says the obama administration has no plans to remove gadhafi from power using military force. instead top u.s. officials are working diplomatic channels to try and push the dictator o. hiarcltoonme t a very clear message to gadhafi, but we're also sending a message to people around him. do you really want to be a pariah? do you really want to end up in the international criminal court? now is your time to get out of this and to help change the direction. >> mike viqueira, good sunday morning to you. >> reporter: good morning action al alex. >> what else are we hearing? >> reporter: critics say there's somet
now go to anderson cooper with "ac 360" live from japan. >>> piers, it is truly an extraordinary development to find somebody alive eight days, particularly remarkable when you consider so many of the injuries and the deaths we've seen were caused by that tsunami with all that debris and fast moving water. remarkable that this person apparently survived that long. and also with freezing cold temperatures at night. we'll try to find out more details on that. also the latest on the nuclear emergency that is ongoing right now. in the fukushima daiichi plant. the latest information on that is that the japanese government is finally admitting that the situation has indeed been worse than previously acknowledged. the government giving a grimmer assessment of the disaster, raising the threat level to level five out of seven, conceding it is worse than they previously said, something america's top nuclear regulator has been saying for two days. the wind had been blowing out to sea. it is now blowing on shore. we'll tell you what that means for cities like tokyo. according to "the new yor
: now to japan. a u.n. expert says radiation continues to leak from those damaged nuclear reactors but progress is being made. all six reactors are now hooked up to power lines-- a step toward getting the cooling systems working once the electricity is turned on the number of workers at the plant is now up to a thousand. meanwhile, the official death toll from the earthquake and tsunami is approaching 10,000 with nearly 14,000 missing. more than a quarter million survivors have no homes or have been forced to leave them. from japan tonight, here's lucy craft. >> reporter: cardboard houses now home for thousands living on the floor of a sports arena outside tokyo. all survived the tsunami and quake only to be caught up in a radiation scare. this fifth grader says "we escaped to my school but when they said even that was not safe, we came here." natives of iwaki like to boast about its postcard scenery and mild climate. the now notorious fukushima nuclear plant only 30 miles away has triggered a mass exodus. "from all sides everyone kept telling us get out of here" says this beautici
>> couric: tonight, two weeks into japan's disaster and it just keeps getting worse. the death toll passes 10,000 and now there may be a breach in one of the nuclear reactors. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the united states may be giving up command of the libya mission, but american forces will still be playing a major role in the operation. the fire that woke up the country to dangers in the workplace. and a population explosion. the colorful comeback of the monarch butterfly. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. japan's prime minister says the nuclear crisis is far from over and the goal right now, he says, is simply to keep it from getting worse. but it did today with a possible breach of one of the reactors. it was two weeks ago that they were damaged when a magnitude nine earthquake shook northern japan and triggered a tsunami. the official death toll passed the 10,000 mark today. 17,000 people are still missing. and now the japanese government has expande
concerns tonight about radiation in japan coming from those damaged nuclear reactors. trace amounts have now been picked up by air monitors in hawaii as well as stations in california, oregon, washington and colorado. authorities say it poses no threat to health. but in the quake zone in japan, the danger from radiation appears to be growing. nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell reports. >> obviously things are not contained completely at this time. >> reporter: there are serious new concerns about reactor 3 at the fukushima site, which uses highly toxic plutonium in its fuel mixture. japanese officials now say there is a high possibility that the third reactor's fuel rods are damaged and it is leaking radioactive water from the reactor itself or from the pumping system being used to try to cool it. there are also concerns about high levels of radiation at 1 and 2. japan's prime minister called the situation grave and says it does not allow any optimism yet. the problem at reactor 3 was discovered when workers stepped into water that had 10,000 times the amount of radiation ty
the latest on the only confirmed american death in japan. >>> and thearents of a rutgers student who committed suicide after police say he was taunted for being gay don't want harsh punishment for those accused. >>> and could it be true? does cbs want charlie sheen back on his t ho >>anhepo enti's ltwnthela yi on to the streets of new york. what sent chris brown into a frenzy? >>> i'm tamron hall. the newsmation is following the latest developments in operation odyssey dawn in libya. crew members are back safe in american hands after the f-15e fighter jet crashed overnight. video of the wreckage. two airmen ejected after the plane developed mechanical problems. the fighter jet was on a strike mission against a libyan missile site. the on-scene commander of the international coalition for libya told a news conference, civilians are under attack by moammar gadhafi's forces in misratah and libya's third largest city. the admiral say the coalition is, quote, considering all objections but did not elaborate. among the coalition targets hit todayç libyan naval base in tripoli. lookin
. the focus simply on their survival in japan. they're either homeless or forced to evacuate their longstanding neighborhoods, and today there's anxiety about food safety. elevated levels of radiation have been detected. after the government banned sails of milk from the fukushima prefecture because of contamination and sales from leafy vegetables from areas as far away as 160 miles. doctor, as wee hearing about this, and simply the numbers are astounding, more than 400,000 people have been displaced. now they're getting the news that some of the food they've been having access to could be contaminated. what's the reaction, what's the response that these people are supposed to have to this? >> right now we really don't know all the information wire going to need to tell people what they can eat and what they can't. the problem with radiation, particularly as it deals with problems in the seawater is there's two kinds of radiation. one eye odied 31, and one cesium 37. the risk here for fish is that these foods, like fish, could concentrate these toxins just the way mercury con
radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged, not forced, to get out of the area. how great is the danger? >>> plus with hispanics making up 1 in every 6 americans and one in every 1 ever 4 children, the huge emphasis on the 2012 election. >>> finally, how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the republican nomination get heard when people like michele bachmann, sarah palin and donald trump are taking up the oxygen. >>> we start with what's next on the libyan front. nbc chief foreign correspondent d geis bghi, afr heldg up of da. whatapnetoy t ou ilia atoue en >> reporter: today we went out of benghazi. and instead of going to the rebel frontline about 100 miles south of here, we went to the frontline and then went around it. and we were able to get inside the city of ajdabiya. ajdabiya is partially held by gadhafi forces and partially held by the rebels themselves. there is street-to-street fighting in the city. in a way, this is progress, the rebels would not have been able to get this far if gadha
america. >>> in japan, new problems at the country's crippled nuclear complex are overshadowing some success at cooling the plant's overheated reactors over the weekend. there had been some optimism. this morning, workers at the facility were evacuated after gray smoke rose from the spent storage pool at the plant's number three reactor. it development comes after officials said they had successfully restored water pumps to two other reactors, putting them under control in a state known as a cold shutdown. the crisis, far from over with the discovery of radiation-tainted vegetables and tap water adding to public fears about contaminated food and drink. all that as officials now predict the death toll there in japan will exceed 18,000 from the earthquake and tsunami that followed. the situation in japan has raised questions in the u.s. energy secretary steven chu weighed in on a controversial nuclear reactor in new york city. >> we'll have to look at weather the reactor should remain. again, i don't want to jump to some judgment about what we should do going forward. the nrc will be l
in japan where today a radiation misreading at the fukushima plant sparked panic as well as evacuation. officials are now calling it a big mistake. charles hadlock is covering the latest developments from nearby, a safe distance, we should note, in south korea. charles, that misreading sparked another evacuation at the plant earlier today. are workers back inside? what is the status at fukushima daiichi right now? >> reporter: well, it was a major miscalculation, peter. a worker was reading the gauges and misrepresented what he saw. he reported he saw a spike of radiation equal to 10 million times what is normal. that turned out to be a miscalculation, and the tokyo electric company, the operators of the fukushima plant, had to back off and say, wait a minute, that's a miscalculation. it's not that bad. it is bad but not that bad. now, how bad is it? well, that water, that pool of water that is around the four reactors there is so radioactive that some radiologists tell me that workers standing in the water for one hour is exposed to four times his annual amount of radiation. so is tha
since tuesday in libya could be released today if libyan officials are to be believed. >>> in japan today, the nuclear crisis is upgraded to level five as authorities try everything to avert a nuclear meltdown. the government now admits it is overwhelmed. >>> plus california lieutenant governor gavin newsom with us on his state's response to the quake and tsunami. >>> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. president obama will be delivering a statement on libya at 2:00 eastern at the white house after meeting with top lawmakers in the situation room. it will be the president's first comments since the u.n. authorized military intervention late last night. france and britain are making plans to send their jets to the region. italy has made its bases available. nato is meeting today in brussels to determine if it will lead any military operations against gadhafi's forces. today secretary clinton said that the world had no threat but to threaten gadhafi to stop his brutal crackdown against the rebels and libyan civilians. nbc's jim maceda is live in tripoli. we've heard so m
. we find ourselves with the world's most under reported story, a massive humanitarian crisis in japan caused by the quake and the following tsunami. what we could all be doing to help. dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. her morning begins with arthritis pain. that's a coffee and two pills. the afternoon tour begins with more pain and more pills. the evening guests arrive. back to sore knees. back to more pills. the day is done but hang on... her doctor recommended aleve. just 2 pills can keep arthritis pain away all day with fewer pills than tylenol. this is lara who chose 2 aleve and fewer pills for a day free of pain. and get the all day pain relief of aleve in liquid gels. and fewer pills for a day free of pain. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at, where customers save an average of $293 a month. call lending tree at... today. [ male announcer ] when you have plaque psoria
, yemen, japan and more. also wisconsin and washington and louisiana. and sharron angle's kitchen in nevada. lots more to come. stay with us. new fixodent plus scope ingredients. cleans and kills germs that cause odors to your dentures. new fixodent cleanser plus scope ingredients. you've been stuck in the garage, while my sneezing and my itchy eyes took refuge from the dust in here and the pollen outside. but with 24-hour zyrtec®, i get prescription strength relief from my worst allergy symptoms. it's the brand allergists recommend most. ♪ lily and i are back on the road again. where we belong. with zyrtec®, i can love the air®. where we belong. how are you getting to a happier place? running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> world financial markets came way back today, which indicates in part that the markets think japan's nuclear crisis is under control, which indicates that world markets maybe
cuisinart. >> caught on air, disaster in japan, 11:00 p.m. eastern eastern on msnbc. you can have the last word online at our blog, and follow my tweets at lawrence. "the rachel maddow show" is up next. sitting in tonight, chris haze. good evening. >> good evening. thank you for staying with us the next hour. rachel has the night off. >>> the nuclear crisis in japan is still volatile tonight. there have been numerous developments today. we'll get to those shortly. we begin with something you should never have to ask, something that should never be a question. are we at war? yes, we are at war in iraq and afghanistan, and maybe sort of in pakistan as well. but are we at war again in another middle eastern country? it is not a provocative rhetorical question, it is one so-called no fly zone over libya and to take all necessary measures to protect civilians under attack. faced with threat from moammar gadhafi of a massacre of his own civilians, united nations approved military action against libya, which is a big fricking deal. for us, for the united nations, for the region. yet what
. i'm thomas roberts. we start in japan where there have been reports of a suspected breach in the core of reactor three. workers were pulled out of the complex as a safety precaution while the possibility of more radiation leaks over that region. japan's prime minister called this situation, quote, very grave and serious during a press conference that was hours after this setback. he reassured the citizens that nuclear techs and the government are taking a cautious approach in each step of this process. >>> the death toll from the dual disasters that rocked the nation continue to rise. more than 10,000 are dead and still 17,000 missing residents. nbc's lee cowan is live in tokyo this morning. lee, what are we hearing right now about the fukushima plant and any kind of extension as a precaution to the japanese exclusion zone for the potential of radiation? >> reporter: well, thomas, there is an extension, although it's still voluntary at this point. the people that were told 19 miles out, 20 miles out that they were told to basically stay indoors over the last couple weeks,
bargaining law from taking effect and nuclear fallout from japan gets an upgrade. live from our studio in washington is special report. >> brett: u.s. ambassador susan rice says muammar khadafy is in violation of resolution that demanded a cease-fire in libya. they called on khadafy to halt military attacks on civilians and if the libyan leader does not stand down, the u.s. will launch military action against him. but he said the summit will not send ground troops into the country. we have team coverage. doug is at the pentagon with the u.s. role and logistics of implementing a no-fly zone. we begin with senior correspondent with rick leventhal who is live in libya in benghazi. >> reporter: it's safe to say that we've seen more check points popping up, more young men with small arms and concern about khadafy's army with libyan official on live television saying that the army was actually on the outskirts of this city, but was not planning to come in. this after reports that the cease-fire was followed by heavier fire from khadafy's army against civilians and soldiers rebel fighters. we
,000 people there. meanwhile in japan, another set back in the effort to control the japanese doubled fukushima plant. there are high levels of radioactive elements in the water there. there is more efforts to pump fresh water in the reactor there. dominic? >>reporter: uma, that's right. u.s. forces and japan getting involved. the navy has two naval barges loaded with 550,000 gallons of fresh water to be pumped in the plant. they are making it up to deliver the water. the united states air force is using c130 to deliver 500 tons was freshh bottled water up to sendai, close to the plantt where there are difficulties getting uncontaminated supplies of water and helping out the public there. the air force based out of the air base west of tokyo, home to 306,000 servicemen who are caught up in this as much as the japanese citizens. >> japp -- japan is our ally and our home. when something happen to japan and we are able to help we are glad to. we raised our hands to say yes, we can help you out. >> the utilit company said the water is contained. but the government is not sure if they are
and bradley manning to the obvious. japan. how officials there ignored alarms about the possibility of a massive quake setting off a nuclear crisis that go back years. are these black swans that keep befalling us truly as unforeseen as everyone would want us to believe? how are you getting to a happier place? running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at plus, get the best deal or we'll pay you $1,000. call lending tree at... today. >>> turning our attention to japan, setbacks at the fukushima nuclear plant there. smoke started rising from reactor three amid fresh concerns about food and water supplies in the area. residents being warned not to drink the tap water and the government has banned shipments of milk and spinach from the region after radiation was detected but could all of this have been prevented? this man had been warnin
we were paying $2.82 a gallon. that's almost 75 cen cheaper. >>> now to japan where workers have reconnected power lines to all three reactors, but there is still a great to do before the power can be turned on. the hope is then the cooling systems would work properly. meantime, "new york times" is reporting that up gentlemanen's government approved a ten-year extension for the oldest of six reactors at that power station. just a month before the big earthquake, despite safety warnings. nbc's bob bazzell joins me. what's the latest? >> it look likes they may have turned the corner in the battle to get that under control. yesterday seemed to be a bad day. one of the storage pools was very hot and the radiation readings was as high as they've been in the accident. but the radiation levels have come down, there's electricity to all the reactors, but it can't be turned on yet. it will be a while before they get them going, but it seems like the trend is in the direction that everyone wants it to be, but there could still be a lot of surprises ahead. in the disaster zone there's still
into an end game that doesn't overcommit us when we're already committed now? we've got this crisis in japan we're trying to help with, etc. so we are stretched thin. >> reporter: general and michael, thank you very much. >> thanks, shannon. >>> well, a leading figure of the libyan opposition movement has released a statement praising coalition forces for military action against qaddafi's regime. ththe pribs's family prince's fd from libya after the coup said the international community should help libya move forward. he said the libyan people cry out to the world to champion their rally for freedom and democracy. steve harrigan and rick leventhal have been provided around the clock coverage. steve was on the air as air strikes hit the area. you can follow that and catch all the developments in libya as military action continues. just log onto >>> well, a glimmer of hope in such a tragic story in japan. an 80-year-old woman and a teenage boy were rescued from the wreckage of a house in northeastern japan nine days after a devastating earthquake and tsunami. both of them were wea
evacuation wasn't accurate. after an error like that, can information from japan about the nuclear reactors be trusted? budget battle. at the beginning of the 112 congress, two freshmen from opposite sides of the aisle promise to work together but with another budget battle looming, can they do it? we talk to the two lawmakers again live. all of that, plus a scandal involving the new york city fire department. should the city be forced to pay money to those who couldn't pass the entrance exam? i'm breech breech and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now -- i'm shannon bream and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now. we begin in japan. the spike in radiation level that led to evacuation was just a mistake. we have the latest. >> reporter: it was a breach coming from the authorities this sunday and we heard an official say that the radiation in water at the plant went to 10 million levels, that would be a catastrophic meltdown scenario numbers. fortunately, it was nowhere near that. radiation levels in the water have spiked four
. >>> there are new radiation concerns in japan this morning. the country's nuclear crisis stretches into the third week. officials said today that highly radioactive iodine seeping from the fukushima nuclear complex may be making its way into seawater north of the plant. mounting obstacles like inadequate storage tanks where efforts have been hindered to bring the facility back from disaster. the water must be removed and safely stored before work can continue to power up the cooling system. they just don't know how long that's going to take before they can get the workers into the plant. adding to the sense of unease across japan, a strong earthquake shook the region today and prompted a brief tsunami alert. measured a magnitude 6.5 and no damage or injuries were reported. radiation from japan appears to have reached as far as the u.s. east coast at least in trace amounts. one sample of massachusetts rainwater registered very low concentrations of radiation. officials say it does not pose a health risk. very latest, let's bring in nbc's lee cowan in tokyo. what's the latest there? >> reporter: we
workers from japan's crippled nuclear power plant ended up in the in the hospital today. they sustained beta ray radiation burns to their legs. they're part of a three-man team working to restore cooling systems at reactor three. smoke could be seen rising from those reactors again. >>> japan's considering bringing in bottled water from overseas. panicked shoppers have cleaned out stores across tokyo after officials warned yesterday not to give tap water to infants. officials say radiation levels in tap water are now back to normal. >>> the u.s. ambassador to japan visited an evacuation center in miyagi prefecture, the hardest hit by the quake and tsunami. it's believed miyagi alone lost 15,000 people. >>> nbc's lee cowan has the latest now from the region. he's in seoul, south korea. lee, good day to you. >> reporter: hey, contessa. yeah, every day, as we've been talking about all week, the death toll seems to climb here. we're now up to nearly 9,700 people that are confirmed dead, nearly 17,000 missing. some 250,000 people remain homeless and another 300,000 are still living in shelte
that have happened around the world, it is facing more conflict plus japan which may be the largest issue that we're facing. >> andrea, it is unbelievable. i repeated to him, the associated press lead, we were on the air doing wrap-up from his speech the other night and they obviously had this set to go. they hit send. and their lead contained the words president obama defended the first war launched on his watch. i left the interview and you've been around this so many times yourself, and i passed through what i called the machinery of the presidency. the security, the aides, there was the tall air force officer serving as the military de you look at his feet. there is theootbal all of the people flew in with him. he has these three plates, balancing on sticks right now. americans in uniform fighting on at least three fronts. that leaves out special forces that are dug into places we can't imagine. and it is quite a world view, i guess, and are we entering this period of kind of ad libbed on the fly foreign policy where these nations are changing in north africa and the middle east befor
ravaged nuclear plant in japan. earlier, workers at that site reported a massive spike in radioactive water in the cooling system. perhaps ten million times as higher than normal, but now plant operators conceding that extremely high reading was wrong. let's go to dominic streaming live from osaka, japan. >> reporter: gregg, they are having extreme problems with highly radioactive water at the four of six troubled reactors. this radioactive water has seeped into buildings around the reactors which is making the job more difficult. up until yesterday, which was sunday japan time for a monday morning, they were actually able to access certain parts and get close to the core as possible to. radioactive water spread to other parts. because workers can only go in for 15 minutes due to the health and safety levels it's making the job doubly difficult. they are not sure where the source has come from. is it the result of the water being sprayed in and actually diluted a lot of the other radioactive water? is it coming from somewhere? they don't know. until they can actually start to drain so
: u.s. navy is rushing to deliver fresh water to japan's damaged nuclear plant to replace the corrosive sea water to try to cool the overheated reashh. fear is the sea water could further compromise efforts to stabilize the reactors. all of this coming as another spike in radiation. japanese government spokesperson the efforts of plant's workers seem to be keeping from the situation getting worse but it's too soon to be optimistic. >> heather: tea party helped the republicans win the house but house speaker john boehner is feeling the heat from some in the tea party movement. tea party nation sounder, he is accusing the speaker of a breaking a pledge to slash spending so he is pushing for a primary opponent against boehner. here is managing editor of the hill. thank you for joining us. let's get off the top, judson phillips he as bull's-eye on the speaker of the house. he says he is a compromised too much when it comes to spending. in your opinion should speaker boehner be concerned and what sort of fracture is this creating on capitol hill? >> she going to win his next re
. appreciate it. >> you bet. >>> in japan, americas are being urged to get supplies of iodine tablets. the very latest on the dangerous nuclear reactors. a full update after this. [ male announcer ] this is charlie whose morning flight to london starts with arthritis pain... and a choice. take tylenol now, and maybe up to 8 in a day. or...choose aleve and 2 pills for a day free of pain. enjoy the flight. you struggle to control your blood sugar. you exercise and eat right, but your blood sugar may still be high, and you need extra help. ask your doctor about onglyza, a once daily medicine used with diet and exercise to control high blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. adding onglyza to your current oral medicine may help reduce after meal blood sugar spikes and may help reduce high morning blood sugar. [ male announcer ] onglyza should not be used to treat type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis. tell your doctor if you have a history or risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. onglyza has not been studied with insulin. using onglyza with medicines such as sulfonylureas may cause low blood sugar.
reactors at japan's krip crippled nuclear plant temperature. they say there is still a lot of work to be done before electricity can be turned on. emergency crews dumped 18 tons of seawater into a nearly boiling pool holding spent nuclear fuel. japan's nikkei market closed with more than a 4% gain today thanks to the good news at the power plant. the index is still 7% lower than its close the day the earthquake and tsunami hit. >>> crews recovered the body of taylor anderson, an american teaching english in miyagi, japan, believed to be the first american victim, the first known one of the quake and tsunami. they estimate miyagi prefecture lost 15,000 people. >>> nbc's lee cowan is live now in seoul, south of korea. what's the story now? what's the situation with fear and whether it is dissipating in that region? >> reporter: i think there is still a lot of fear, it depends on where you are. if you are talking in the north, you are still focused so much on the search and rescue effort. it is still officially search and rescue. they go through the rebel with sticks trying their best
of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way. how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the republican nomination get heard if people like michele bauchmann, sarah palin, and donald trump suck up the oxygen. >>> we start with what's next on the libyan front. nbc chief foreign correspondent richard engel is in benghazi after a heralding couple of days. what happened today on the ground in libya that you've seen? >> reporter: tdaye went out of benghazi and instead of going to the rebel frontline about 100 miles south of here, we went to the frontline and then went around it. and we were able to get inside the city of ajd
. thanks for joining us. >> thank you. >> the world continues to read like a world atlas. yemen, japan and more. also wisconsin and washington and louisiana and sharon angle's kitchen in nevada. stay with us. bl or we'll pay you $1,000. call lending tree at... today. add listerine® total care for more complete oral care. ♪ it works in six different ways to restore enamel, strengthen teeth, freshen breath, help prevent cavities, and kill bad breath germs for a whole mouth clean. so go beyond the brush with listerine® total care. the most complete mouthwash. and for visibly whiter teeth, try listerine® total care plus whitening. and for visibly whiter teeth, how are you getting to a happier place? running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> financial markets came back that indicates in part that the market thinks the nuclear crisis is under control that indicates that the world markets don't pay close atte
're expecting that announcement at 3:00 eastern time. >>> still touch and go at japan's nuclear power plant, but they're still structure ally sound. smoke started rising from reactor numbers two and three. the smoke eventually stopped. the plant operator says it's not clear what started the smoke in the first place. >>> the just is making potassium iodide to u.s. personnel in tokyo and abu ghraib, trophy pictures of soldiers posing with bodies of afghan civiliance. what possibly could the military say to explain it? >>> plus it's a list no parent wants to see their teen's name on. and the latest case of cyber bullying. >>> a dramatic rescue of an entire family including a six month old puppy. [ sneezes ] allergies? you think i have allergies? you're sneezing. i'm allergic to you. doubtful, you love me. hey, you can't take allegra with fruit juice. what? yeah, it's on the label. really? here, there's nothing about juice on the zyrtec® label. what? labels are meant to be read. i'd be lost without you. i knew you weren't allergic to me. [ sneezes ] you know, you can't take allegra with orange
at some point. thank you, william bratton for joiningus. >> can japan import enough bottled water to ease fears of nuclear contamination? >>> open court. chris brown says he's sorry about his latest outburst, but could his morning meltdown land him behind bars? >>> time for the "your business" entrepreneur of the week. beach volley players turned their passion into a year-round activity. they created the sand box in mystic, connecticut, the only indoor volleyball facility in new england. they're attracting players around the reege to this unique concept. watch "your business" sunday mornings 7:30 on msnbc. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] with amazing innovation, driven by relentless competition, wireless puts the world at your command. ♪ wireless puts the world at your command. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at, where customers save an average of $293 a month. call lending tree at... today. [scraping] [piano keys banging] [scraping] [horns honking] iteelie's holdyourarack. let me guess, 16. [laughing] yeeah. that's why there's castrol gtx... w
much. >> thank you, andrea. >>> now to the latest to the crisis in japan. police there say the official death toll now has reached 9,800 people. 17,500 people still remain missing. two workers are trying to stabilize the fukushima nuclear power plant, two of those workers were injured when they stepped into radioactive water and were hospitalized, but authorities say that they were exposed to levels below the maximum allowed for plant workers. >>> the u.s. military has more than 19,000 marines and sailors, 20 ships, 140 aircrafts assisting with relief efforts in japan. and in a surprise move, north korea is helping out as well. kim jong-il has sent $500,000 million for relief for ethnic koreans living in japan. >>> today, tokyo's drinking water has been deemed safe again, a day after radiation levels sent many scrambling for bottled water. but some of the neighboring communities around tokyo are now reporting increased radiation levels. nbc' lee cowan is live for us in so seoul, south korea. the improvement, a day forward -- one step forward, two steps back. it seems not only the radiat
morning, everybody. this is a shocking development out of japan. imagine how concerned you would be as a parent if there was radiation in the drinking water that was twice the recommended level for infants. >> that's what millions of parents in tokyo are dealing with this morning. levels of radioactive iodine were found at a treatment center. now parents are advised not to give it to infants. the latest in a live report from tokyo ahead. >> also ahead, richard engel has made his way to the rebel front lines in libya following a fourth straight night of coalition missile strikes. >> a lot of serious stories to talk about. but on a lighter note, have you seen this viral video. this is a 5-month-old boy who can't decide what to make of the sound of his mom blowing her nose. first he's laughing, then horrified. then bursts out laughing again. i think 8 million people have watched this online. we'll watch the little boy and his parents coming up. >> on a more serious note, the dangerousle levels of radiation in tokyo's drinking level. robert bazell joins us again this morning. hey, bo
to unbelievable military support of the situation in japan, ongoing effort, obviously in afghanistan and our ongoing effort to wind down the war in iraq, we thought it was much more important rather than sit by and watch the slaughter of these innocents, to bring along is the international community. we didn't wait to see where the international community was, we brought them along. now we have an opportunity to press for the kind of opportunity for 9 opposition that i think they're looking for and they're taking. >> denis, i just want to nail something down, you fellows, people in the administration led by the president, with the guidance of the people around him, including the secretary of state and others, you believed gadhafi was going to do what he said. he was using terms like disinfected germs, go house by house, you believed he would do that on a mass basis? >> well, there certainly was a lot of evidence to suggest as much, chris, and given the history of this country and the great things that we have done to protect innocents and various instances across history and across the globe
't drink the water. japan warns parents that radiation levels in tap water is dangerous for infants in tokyo. >>> health care one year later. the fifth grader turned activist who was with president obama when he signed the landmark law, joins us. >>> and -- >> doesn't seem fair. what i feel, what you felt long ago, when i was very young, i could say to myself this was how love was. >> the death of a hollywood legend. elizabeth taylor dies from congestive heart failure at the age of 79. we will talk exclusively with her sixth husband, former u.s. senator, john warner. >>> and good day, everyone, i'm andrea mitchell, live in washington. we begin with developing news out of jerusalem today. israeli officials report that one woman now has died after a bomb tore through the crowd at a bus stop in the center of jerusalem. dozens of people were injured in the explosion, labeled a terrorist attack by israeli police. the city is on high alert. the entrance to jerusalem has been closed. michael oren is israel's ambassador to the united states and joins me now. first of all, our condolences. t
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